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The dangers of tailgating

No matter where your car takes you, you’ve probably experienced tailgating. Maybe another vehicle pulled close to your rear bumper before passing you. Maybe a speeding semi-truck got too close for comfort before slowing to suit the flow of traffic. Maybe an impatient driver tried to force you to speed up. No matter the situation, this aggressive driving could put you at serious risk of a car crash.

Tailgating can make it difficult or even impossible for other vehicles to stop in time.

Speeding drivers can pose another serious risk to your health and safety if they are driving too close to your vehicle. Most vehicles need over 130 feet to stop when traveling at 55 miles per hour. Large commercial vehicles, on the other hand, need nearly 200 feet to effectively stop at highway speeds. These distances only increase when inclement weather hits, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has recommended that truck drivers double their following distance when conditions are poor.

Tailgating is one of the top causes of rear-end collisions.

Tailgating is one of the leading causes of rear-end collisions, and follow distance has been linked to at least 5 percent of accidents involving large commercial vehicles. Rear-end collisions also cause nearly one-quarter of roadway fatalities and many more severe accidents.

If you have been harmed as a result of tailgating, seek help immediately.

After an accident, it is important that you report your accident and get medical help as soon as possible. Speaking to the police—and to an attorney—is one of the best ways to hold reckless drivers responsible for the damage that they have done. Immediate medical care is also essential, and will help ensure that your injuries do not go untreated in the aftermath of an accident.

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